November 21, 2007

Teenage Drunk Driving

Teenage drunk driving is a serious problem for our nations youth. It’s hard to believe but more and more teenagers are using and abusing alcohol and/or drugs than ever before. Combine that with the intense peer pressure that teenagers go through and we have a serious problem called teenage drunk driving.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) reports that motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teenagers between the ages of 15 and 20. One report puts the numbers of high school students who admit to driving after drinking at almost 50% of those polled. That’s a staggering statistic by any means but what’s even worse is that these are teenagers who aren’t used to being behind the wheel, going through emotional changes/puberty, and subject to a tremendous amount of peer pressure.

The problem comes from the amount of teenagers with access to alcohol and/or drugs. Statistics show that one out of every ten teens (age 12-13) drink alcohol at a minimum of once per month. By limiting the access that these teenagers have to drugs and/or alcohol we are half way there to controlling this dangerous problem of teenage drunk driving.

Teenage drunk drivers also face some serious legal consequences that will harm them into their adult lives. They face revocation of their driving privileges, stiff fines, probation, alcohol education and treatment, and community service not to mention potential jail/prison time for a severe offense.

Overall this problem has not gotten enough publicity and awareness… most parents don’t realize that their kids have access to alcohol nonetheless that they ‘may’ be driving drunk. The solutions to this problem encompass education, awareness, preventing access to alcohol, and most of all prevention.

http://www.stopdrinkingadvice.org/guide/

Drunk Driving Car Crash

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